Green Building Community

Cellulose Insulation

Frank MA, United States 0 Ratings 2 Discussions 0 Group posts

Posted by: Frank // Disruptive Technology Scientist


I have been trying to find out about Cellulose Insulation, the newspaper stuff.
Last winter my attic leaked water came in onto the Cellulose Insulation.
My question is when Cellulose Insulation gets wet does that mean mold will
grow in the Cellulose Insulation?
Do I need to remove all the Cellulose Insulation?

The information I am finding on-line is contradictory.
Is there going to be mold growing in the Cellulose Insulation?

Reply
Insul8 0 Ratings 1 Discussions 0 Group posts

Insul8 // Insulation Specialist

Frank, it really depends on when the cellulose was installed. Most modern day cellulose is treated with borate which is a natural mold inhibitor, as well as, a fire retardant. In addition, the paper is hygroscopic which means it disperses the moisture quickly. With proper attic ventilation, this means the cellulose will dry out fast and not allow the mold to grow (no water = no mold). While the water was present, the borates will inhibit the mold growth until it does dry. However, if the cellulose was an early version (say, pre-1977), it may not have been treated. Prior to about 1977, cellulose was not required to have a fire treatment in them. There were a lot of homes stuffed with paper and you can imagine what happened in a fire. Now that the fire retardants are required, homes are much safer. So, based on the age of your home or when you know it was insulated, will be the answer to your question.

StyroHome Maple Ridge, BC, canada 0 Ratings 6 Discussions 0 Group posts

StyroHome // Super Insulated, Passive House, Net Zero

The fastest way to destroy your house today is by using the wrong insulation techniques and insulation That thing you hear about on the news "Climate Change" has made the insulation choices more important that in the past. Fibrous insulation holds moisture and with Climate disasters today we see more water and insurance payouts rising with many not even being covered for acts of nature. Water soaked fibers that say in wall for a few hours must will not dry itself, and must be removed and then replaced with new materials after the wood frame is totally dry. So I would avoid this type of insulation at all costs.

On: 06/22/2015 Insul8 wrote:

Frank, it really depends on when the cellulose was installed. Most modern day cellulose is treated with borate which is a natural mold inhibitor, as well as, a fire retardant. In addition, the paper is hygroscopic which means it disperses the moistur…

 

Please be kind and respectful!

Please make sure to be respectful of the organizations and companies, and other Rate It Green members that make up our community. We welcome praise and advice and even criticism but all posted content and ratings should be constructive in nature. For guidance on what constitutes suitable content on the Rate It Green site, please refer to the User Agreement and Site Rules.

The opinions, comments, ratings and all content posted by member on the Rate It Green website are the comments and opinions of the individual members who posts them only and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies or policies of Rate It Green. Rate It Green Team Members will monitor posted content for unsuitable content, but we also ask for the participation of community members in helping to keep the site a comfortable and open public forum of ideas. Please email all questions and concerns to admin@rateitgreen.com