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Beyond Redlining Webinar Series, Exploring Historical Patterns of Racism, Presented by the American Bar Association

Allison Friedman MA, United States 0 Ratings 351 Discussions 89 Group posts

Posted by: Allison Friedman // Rate It Green Admin

Redlining, Patterns of Racism in Community Development

The American Bar Association has put together a multi-part free webinar series exploring historical patterns of racism in the context of redlining by exploring the intersections of the Black Lives Matters movement and community development.  The 3 sessions were recorded and are available to watch at your convenience, along with additional resource for more information: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/events_cle/beyond-redlining-webinar-series/

 

Beyond Redlining: Black Lives Matter and Community Development | Recorded June 17

Racial discrimination in mortgage lending in the 1930s shaped the demographic and wealth patterns of American communities today, a new study shows, with 3 out of 4 neighborhoods “redlined” on government maps 80 years ago continuing to struggle economically. A recent study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition indicates that the overwhelming majority of neighborhoods marked “hazardous” in red ink on maps drawn by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp. from 1935 to 1939 are much more likely than other areas today to consist of lower-income, minority residents. This panel of expert legal professionals will address the long term impacts of redlining on community development, housing, education, and economic justice.

Panelists

  • Patricia Broussard, Professor of Law, Florida A&M University College of Law
  • Audrey McFarlane, Associate Dean of Faculty Research & Development and Dean Julius Isaacson Professor of Law, University of Baltimore School of Law
  • Jessica Etienne, Assistant State Attorney, Florida’s 17th Judicial Circuit
  • Renee Hatcher, Assistant Professor of Law, UIC John Marshall School of Law; Director, Community Enterprise & Solidarity Economy Clinic, UIC John Marshall School of Law
  • Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

Moderator

  • Kelecia Njaka, President, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University
  • Diamond Griffith, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University



Beyond Redlining: Black Lives Matter and Community Development, Part 2 | Recorded July 10

A recent study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition indicates that the overwhelming majority of neighborhoods marked “hazardous” in red ink on maps drawn by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp. from 1935 to 1939 were much more likely than other areas today to consist of lower-income, minority residents. This panel of expert professionals will address the long term impacts of redlining on community development, housing, education, and economic justice.

Welcome and Introduction

  • Judy Perry Martinez, President, American Bar Association; Of Counsel, Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn

Panelists

  • Patience Crowder, Associate Professor, Community Economic Development Clinic, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
  • Sheila Foster, Scott K. Ginsburg Professor of Urban Law and Policy and Professor of Public Policy, Georgetown University

Co-Moderators

  • Kelecia Njaka, President, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University

  • Diamond Griffith, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University



Beyond Redlining: Black Lives Matter and Community Development, Part 3 | Recorded July 22

A recent study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition indicates that the overwhelming majority of neighborhoods marked “hazardous” in red ink on maps drawn by the federal Home Owners’ Loan Corp. from 1935 to 1939 are much more likely than other areas today to consist of lower-income, minority residents. This panel of expert legal professionals will address the long term impacts of redlining on community development, housing, education, and economic justice.

Panelists

  • Sajid Khan, Public Defender, San Jose, California
  • Sabine O’Hara, Dean and Director, Landgrant Programs for the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES), University of the District of Columbia
  • Jeremy Orr, Staff Attorney, Safe Water Initiative, NRDC
  • Etienne Toussaint, Assistant Professor of Law, University of District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

Co-Moderators

  • Michael Bell, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University

  • Reggi Simmons, Barry Black Law Students Association, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law, Barry University

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